“It turns out it’s a great idea to let Spielberg loose on this revolutionary film making technology. However, just please don’t let George Lucas get his grubby Ewok paws on it.”

Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn Review
By Ryan Casey

The creator of The Adventures of Tintin, George Remi (AKA Herge), once stated he felt Steven Spielberg would be the only man capable of transferring his world famous comic book series onto the big screen. In 2011 his theory has been put to the test as Spielberg presents his vision of the Belgian reporter, with the unmistakeable quiff. With an ensemble of British writing talent; Edgar Wright, Steven Moffat and Joe Cornish have all applied their knowledge of the series to oversee the screenplay, whilst actors Jamie Bell, Daniel Craig, Andy Serkis, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost have been given the task of bringing the characters to life.

PLOT SYNOPSIS
Upon coming into possession of a model ship of the naval vessel, ‘the Unicorn’, it’s not long before Tintin (Jamie Bell) becomes aware of the grand history behind the enigmatic vessel, that thrusts him into an action packed adventure of mystery and intrigue.

The cunning villain, Ivan Ivanovitch Sakharine (Daniel Craig), wants the model ship for himself, as it holds the key to an ancient treasure buried amidst the wreck of the actual Unicorn ship. It is up to Tintin, with the help of the hapless detective duo Thompson & Thomson (Pegg & Frost) and the eccentric drunk Captain Haddock (Andy Serkis), to foil the evil Sakharine and beat him in a race for the treasure.

RYAN RATES
The CGI in The Adventures of Tintin is nothing short of spectacular. Every encompassing location, to the inanimate objects within them, has been afforded a meticulous attention to detail that generates a truly stunning computer generated world. Using the same technology used to create James Cameron’s ‘Avatar’ the characters construction is a triumph. While each accurately resembles their original cartoon guise, all are given unique personalities and natural mannerisms, plus frighteningly realistic skin tones, features and depth, you would be forgiven for thinking these 3D constructs where actual physical personalities.

Slight splattering’s of humour have always been evident in Spielberg’s work, add three British comedy writers to the mix and The Adventures of Tintin has it in abundance. The movies wit is welcome and is crucial in keeping the narrative (which ebbs and flows) enthralling throughout. The antics of Captain Haddock and Thompson & Thomson are very entertaining, much to the credit of the actors behind them. Hardly suprising with Andy Serkis, the King of Mocap adding yet another CGI classic to his acting belt.

RATING
I was never really a Tintin fan as a boy much prefering ‘Asterix & Obelix’, however, this movie may force me to switch my loyalties. Especially after watching ‘Asterix and Obelix Take on Caesar’. Comparisons to Indiana Jones are certainly justified. It turns out it’s a great idea to let Spielberg loose on this revolutionary film making technology. However, just please don’t let George Lucas get his grubby Ewok paws on it.

Maniac Rating - 4 Stars